About your Search

20100101
20100131
STATION
CSPAN 9
CSPAN2 8
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of canada about the cabinet picks for hamid karzai. what is the concern over the choices that president karzai is making? guest: he has now made two set of choices. he nominated one slate of cabinet officials, about 24 of them. 17 were rejected by the parliament. but arlin is in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing -- the parliament is, in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing, checks and balances. he looked at the first slate of nominees by president karzai and parliament did not like them. they did confirm the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, the minister of defense and the minister of interior, which handles all of the police. the minister of finance, the minister of agriculture, when the biggest recipients of assistance. -- one of the biggest recipient of assistance. those picks are clear. president karzai has recently over the weekend submitted a second state to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate are lesser- known people. many people have not heard -- many afghans h
karzai government who stole the election and ruled only topple. so much of afghanistan is effectively run by the taliban. in addition, we've had eight years with the u.s. has isolated between the kinetic counterterrorism strategy and a counterinsurgency strategy that tries to protect people. and we have seen the last oscillation of that. this happened during the bush administration, and now it's happening again in the obama administration that we are moving back to a counterinsurgency strategy. now besides afghanistan being a much harder, not to crack that iraq we now have a lot of domestic factors affecting the u.s. policy. the american public is war weary after two wars stretched out over many years. and i think it's politically perilous for any politician in a democracy to escalate a war that is already unpopular, even lbj didn't do that when he escalated the vietnam war. u.s. spending in afghanistan is more per year than any other military spends on the planet. so we're dumping a lot of resources into afghanistan. the afghan war is expected to cost another trillion dollars over the ne
which is often not the case. hamid karzai is not particularly interested in doing that. at one point, his generals came to him and said these changes are starting to demoralize the army and his reply was i don't care. if they are bad i will demoralize them some more. there are a few instances where political considerations outweigh merit in how commanders are chosen. sometimes in the military there is a tendency to say how dare we let that happen? certainly it can be damaging in many ways but keep in mind that war is a political activity. there are cases where politics from merrick. our civil war is an excellent example. abraham lincoln gave ships to a lot of inexperienced politicians in the north in order to get their help in reporting people from their state and so forth. ultimately at the higher level you have some sort of balance between merit and political considerations. afghanistan has that balance and the government has not put merit often a enough. in the book i go into a lot of detail on what foreign powers in the united states and afghanistan to improve the leaders of indi
government as well. guest: years ago when he met with hamid karzai at a dinner, someone said to him, mr. president, how are you going to address this problem of corruption? in fact, he said, what problem? joe biden, famously -- dinner was over -- he threw his napkin down and said, this dinner is over, and walked out. nothing has happened to defrost his relations with president karzai. both biden and richard holbrooke have terrible relations with karzai. host: james traub is with us to talk about the influence of joe biden. republicans, 202-737-0001. democrats, 202-737-0002. independents, 202-628-0205. you can send us an e-mail or tweet us at. next phone call. caller: i think our president is doing very well. if we wanted joe biden as president, he would be president. i like the idea that our president is intelligent. he is not a puppet, like the last eight years. i think he is doing what he is supposed to be doing. host: james traub? guest: i guess i would agree, in general. he believes he could be a good president. i believe this is almost a desirable alternative. he is a very knowledg
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. the book centers on this incident which i described where u.s. special operators blocked hamid karzai's planned governor for kabul. she interweaves into it a very well-written and interestingly a history that is well-written, well-organized, and based on a lot of her own research with the original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from joe haversty's book "the opium season" which details a year in which he was involved in as a subcontractor in the usaid efforts in 2 004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with the work force from up opium production. it gives a great view of the violence and corruption. and moreover it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is rory stewart, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked to kabul in the winter which is supposed to kill you and through pashtun villages and described that experienc
, if someone is a relative of karzai then things become problematic. we like to think we are going to defer to the host nation's judgement but sometimes we have got to have a role in the same thing goes too in iraq early on we said we are going to let the afghans do it. you have got to let the native population to get themselves. sometimes that just doesn't work and sometimes the americans just have to get more involved. >> a question over here. >> hi tom. i have got to comment. i am a civil affairs guy and i have that kind of a comment for tom and then a question for mark. i have got to pick up on where you left off on your final point because i think in my experience as a practitioner in this kind of business to include low level counterinsurgency operations and i just did in liberia. >> i just want to point out that chris was the one of the great heroes when he tried to keep the kobo from blowing up. >> i think there is way too much emphasis on hearts and minds. as i like to tell people i don't care if you like me because i'm going home to write my harley-davidson. so my mission here is
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
ability for governments. this was discussed at length to present karzai, and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably in putting the trip that hillary clinton and i made an afghanistan in october 18 and 19th in conjunction with president karzai's inauguration. the afghans understood this. they are very comfortable with it. . . to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it helped -- influenced me a lot as we tried to develop our own benchmarks. but i think we have to be very careful about two things. maybe th
as the prime minister of pakistan and are meeting with president karzai. it was an interesting juxtaposition as we looked to the military component what is happening on the government's side in both pakistan and afghanistan. when it comes to the governance issue in afghanistan, in our meeting with president karzai, he stressed very much the significance of the upcoming parliamentary elections. the need to ensure that under the afghan constitution, that process moves forward to clearly define or establish the legitimacy of the afghan government and their processes as they move ahead. we also had an opportunity to visit the police training centers there in kabul. very important to understand the progress that is being made at the afghan army is being trained. they truly are operating at a deficit in terms of the numbers and bringing more recruits in, but what they have seen in the past several months has been remarkable in terms of the numbers of recruits that have come in. we met with the minister of defense, who indicated that just in the past month, the number of recruits that they have rec
the delegation. we rallied the world behind the administration's new strategy. since then, karzai has been re-elected, a messy election, but it's done. president obama's announced the 30,000 troops you just referred to. and it's a very good time to bring the world back together to reaffirm its support and to move to the next stage, because we're now -- 2010 is going to be a year of heavy implementation. >> is about getting money from these -- >> no, this is not a pledging conference. enough of those for the time being. countries are coming through, the japanese have just quadrupled their aid. we're going to increase our assistance in many ways, but this is about policy. >> now, let's go to afghanistan's attempts to try to get the taliban, at least not the leaders of the taliban, but sort of the rank and file of the taliban reintegrated in some form in the government. is this possible -- we see that every attempt, it feels like one step forward, three steps back at this point. >> let's not confuse two things. reintegration and reconciliation. i know these are complicated words, but reconciliat
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
was -- >> the karzai government -- >> i think again this is one that is also better directed to the state department i think it is probably a sign of some progress house odd as that may sound that there is a healthy give-and-take between the branches of government and in a space afghanistan where the parliament, the legislature is saying we are not going to necessarily rubber-stamp the president's cabinet choices. we have checks and balances here, the congress has to confirm every cabinet selection here and a similar thing is going on there. with that said we have a process as quickly as possible because the government in afghanistan is something that needs to improve quickly and the longer there is limbo the more difficult that becomes. yes, go ahead. >> [inaudible] -- about to happen in yemen and the u.s. but already some of the top leaders pushed back of the exact level of taking from the u.s. and and and -- does that told the u.s. caused with operations to help identify [inaudible] >> i haven't seen the comments which you refer. i've seen other comments from the many military or civilian leaders t
for the electoral process. it was a sickness can step. we are now watching closely as the karzai yet patrician and parliament put together the key ministers of the national government. we are going to continue our efforts in afghanistan but we also recognize, as the president outlined, we need to continue to move as rapidly as possible because clearly we want as i am sure the afghan people want to be able to see this transition where functions that may well be done today by the national community that we are building up the capacity for the government to be able to assume these responsibilities over the next couple of years. >> i have a question about a related country, and i would be human. haleh tomb are you to be anti-american, anti-western or antiforeign sentiment in yemen and do you have any concerns that those feelings would hinder or hurt your attempt to to help the yemenis government? >> well, i think we continue to look for ways in which we can support the yemeni government on military bases, civilian basis and economic basis and we are encouraged by the recent comments by the preside
the president karzai can't count on parliaments report. most of his nominees expressed discontent with the candidates competence. the "new york times" says 17 were rejected and 17 approved. all but one are currently cabinet ministers the president's office had no comment on friday. they said the news conference would be held today. the effect where is difficult to predict it's he'll try to make recess appointments once the parliament leads for the winter break but there's a deep divide between the president and parliament and could leave a number of ministry as drift under deputy ministers that lack political power. this morning from the "new york times". ellen from sunnyville new york. is yemen the new front on terrorism? caller: absolutely. this president and e reck holder don't get it. they're going into more, al qaeda is going into regions where they understand this president won't do anything to the countries that don't have the capabilities we have and nobody is talking about the fact that this animal, actually was going to kill innocent women and children on an airplane ca
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)